Change in Hypertension Guidelines sparks new journey in managing high blood pressure

The Omron EVOLV® wireless upper arm device syncs to your smartphone via the Omron Connect US app, so data can be stored, tracked and shared with your doctor.

The Omron EVOLV® wireless upper arm device syncs to your smartphone via the Omron Connect US app, so data can be stored, tracked and shared with your doctor.

In response to the ’s (AHA) reclassification of , reminds Americans of the importance of monitoring your blood pressure regularly, knowing your numbers and taking action to control .

“Today’s AHA announcement means millions more Americans are now considered hypertensive. How can you know if your status has changed? The journey for everyone begins with knowing your . That means monitoring it regularly, so you can track changes over time – and acting on your numbers to reduce the health risks that come with hypertension,” said , president and CEO of Omron Healthcare.

At its annual Scientific Sessions, announced a reclassification of high blood pressure. Produced by the AHA and the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the new guidelines define a blood pressure measurement of 130/80 mmHg as the threshold for hypertension. The last official US hypertension guideline was 140/90 mmHg, established by the (JNC) under the auspices of the NIH in 2003.

Before today’s announcement, the CDC estimated 75 million Americans as hypertensive – with 11.5 million of them not aware1 of their condition and living with increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

Under the new criteria, approximately 103 million Americans will now be categorized as having high blood pressure – that’s 45.6% of Americans (up from 31.9% under the previous criteria). Many of these people are younger than age 45. With the new guidelines, incidence of high blood pressure nearly triples among men age 20 to 44, up to 30 percent from 11 percent. The rate of hypertension in women under 45 nearly doubles to 19 percent from 10 percent.

“The release of the new on hypertension reminds us of the importance of knowing your numbers, so that you may act on them. Hypertension means increased risk for heart attack and stroke. Knowing your numbers and taking action can prevent a cardiac event – and can even save your life,” said Kellogg.

The new AHA guidelines emphasize the importance of behavior change to control hypertension, and endorses blood pressure measurement at home.

“Monitoring your blood pressure regularly is easy with highly accurate devices designed for at-home use. Innovations in personal have made them more mobile, more connected and more convenient than ever before,” said Kellogg.

Kellogg noted new blood pressure monitors such as the EVOLV®, a wireless, upper arm model without tubes, connect to your smartphone via the Omron Connect US app, so data can be stored, tracked and shared with your doctor. Omron is the number one doctor and pharmacist recommended brand in blood pressure monitors.

“Tracking your blood pressure more often and sharing that data with your doctor means greater patient-to-physician dialogue and more insights for better treatment and better outcomes,” said Kellogg.

Omron Healthcare has made Going for Zero – the elimination of heart attacks and strokes – its company mission. Kellogg said the company is working toward that mission with a national public education campaign, collaboration with partners and investment in new innovations in Omron blood pressure monitors, which will be unveiled in 2018.

“There are two ways most people learn they are hypertensive: their condition is revealed by monitoring their blood pressure, or they suffer a cardiac event. Today, as Americans watch the of the AHA announcement, our message is: Don’t find out the hard way. High blood pressure means higher health risk. You can get a personal blood pressure monitor online or at a local retailer. Know your numbers and see your doctor right away if your numbers fall within the hypertensive range as it’s now defined,” said Kellogg. (PRNewswire)